Cougar v5 Chassis PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jamie Diamond   
Tuesday, 17 August 2010 10:54

 

Here's the Cougar v5, that's version 5 (we're now on v6), chassis.    It did pretty well both at maneuvering on the LEGO pip surface of the moon, and climbing the ridge and crater walls.

The arm was shorter than our current arm but it did use the internal differential allowing us to raise and lower the arm and to open and close the grabber on the end with a single motor .  We had intended to go into each crater to pick up the two rings, but we couldn't stay far enough away from the first ring to pick it up without knocking it down.   So we switched out this arm for a longer arm and started grabbing the first ring from outside the crater and the 2nd ring from inside the crater. Much better!

We still had a chain drive and then gave us 2 problems.  One, their was quite a bit of slop in the chain, especially when changing from forward to reverse.  And two, it would skip some under heavy loads and occasionally the chain would break.  If that happens, mission over! 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 August 2010 09:55
 
My Last Cougar LEGO Robotics Team Practice PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 16 August 2010 12:50
My last Cougar Lego practice was on last Thursday.  We continued to program the robot and we are now able to get 4 of the rings and stay on the white platform for 5 seconds.  That means we can go over the wall.  I would like to say good bye and good luck to my fellow Cougar team mates and friends and to all the other 20 teams I would like to wish you good luck.  I hope you learn more about yourself and others and what you're capable of.  I hope you learn more about teamwork and robotics.  I hope you all have as much fun as I had when you finish the Moonbots Challenge and are proud of all the hard work you put into the challenge.  Bye everyone!!!!!! Smile
Last Updated on Monday, 16 August 2010 16:04
 
Cougar's MoonBot Arm with Internal Differential PDF Print E-mail
Written by Joey   
Saturday, 14 August 2010 21:22

Here's a picture of our new arm.  It sorta has a built in differential.  The Motor will spin the gears to close the arm.  Once the arm closes so the gears can't spin any more then the motor will lift the arm.  When the motor runs the other direction it will open the arm as far as the arm-stops and then lower the arm.  The jaws of the arm act as the locking mechanism for the gears to raise the arm. This idea was from the E-Bots Loudmouths in the FIRST LEGO League Smart Move Challenge. They had an arm similar to this design.

For the LEGO Digital Designer CAD we had to substitute a double conical 12 for a double conical 20 gear on the inside of the arm on the axle next to but not through the motor.  We just couldn't make the 20 fit even tho it fits in real life. 

 

Attachments:
Download this file (Cougar Arm with Differential.lxf)Cougar Arm with Differential.lxf[ ]19 Kb14/08/10 21:30
Last Updated on Saturday, 14 August 2010 21:51
 
8/12/10 Fine Tunning PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 13 August 2010 20:49

ok, so today we got a LOT done.  Working with our new epicly(which is not a real word) improved chassis, we made great progress.  The new robot, which in our programs is referred to as "x" no longer has any chain.  It has gears directly connected to each other to provide direct power, preventing chain slop, and slipping.  In addition, the arm has been modified, and we added an Ultrasonic sensor to the back of the robot for back up to proximity.  Lastly, this new Robot we built is lighter than the others.  This is due to it having a smaller frame, and needing less braces to counteract chain tension.  Overall, this new robot is miles better at getting over walls!  PLUS, its long arm can grab rings VERY VERY effectively.

So enough about the robot, here is what WE DID:  We tweaked our program that we had before.  Our Cougar Rover can now grab the 2 north helium-3 rings, the two water rings on the right side of the field, stay on the pad of light, and cross the walls!  "HIP-HIP, HOORAY!"  and, we can grab the rings pretty reliably.  Now we are moving onto the other side of the ridge that we started on, and attempting to get the Left side Yellow rings.  After that, we will go for the last Blue water, head for Base, and be home free!  Here we come moon!  The Cougars are in business!

-philip

 
Thanks Cougars PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 11 August 2010 23:34

Thanks to the help of The Cougars, 3rd in FLL for the Smart Move World Festival, we are getting sensors, loops, switches under our belt.  If this old coot can figure it out with a lot of books and external wisdom, I figure anyone can figure it out if you put your mind to it.  It was two nights of work.

Tips:  Although the rule of thumb is to have the light sensor just 1 or 2 pennies above the mat, my old mat has some high spots which cause the sensor to see low reflection value when it may still be white.  I lifted mine up 4mm and all is good.  The baffles are more for "teaching" purposes.  The bot runs fine without them given the extreme contrast.

Do it in chunks.  Use sound and the wait block. (using an NXT button) to move to the next chunk of code.  Don't let your batteries get low....like I did and waste an hour plus.  Be sure you know how to read your battery voltage.  If you want to see the NXT=G 1.1/1.05 program just ask.

Come by Thursday to have a look.  I am going to start taking Smart Move elements apart.  If anyone wants to borrow the half table for the weekend....it is available.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzUSWEQfbhE

Coach Jud
Yappin' Yoda's 

Last Updated on Friday, 13 August 2010 23:38
 
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FTC Blog

FIRST Tech Challenge
The official FTC Blog
  • Exciting Changes to Match Play
    Over the past decade, FIRST® Tech Challenge has continued to grow, serving the FIRST mission of creating excitement and exposing students to the wonderful world of science, technology, engineering and math. With growth, must come change, as most of our community has seen through our evolution of robot technology. We continue to work to make this program more accessible and affordable, while still engaging and challenging students of all skill levels.


    Since the 2015 season, FIRSTTech Challenge has moved away from a centralized control system to the Android based platform you see today. The increased reliability of the Android based/REV platform, is allowing us to improve the flow of the matches. We are making significant and exciting changes that teams and volunteers need to be aware of for the 2017-2018 season.



    Autonomous to Driver Controlled Transition

    Starting in the 2017-2018 season, there will no longer be a hard stop following the autonomous period to transition to the driver controlled period of the match. Once the autonomous portion of the match ends, the emcee/game announcer will tell the teams to pick up their driver station. As a visual cue, the scoring system will display to teams that they must pick up their driver station. Teams will only have 5 seconds to pick up their driver station, so they should make sure to pay close attention! After the 5 seconds, there will be a 3-2-1 countdown and the driver controlled period of the match will begin right away.

    Why make the change?
    • Since the reliability of our technology has come so far, the large gap between autonomous and driver controlled periods of the match is no longer necessary.
    • The game design doesn’t require field reset between the autonomous and driver controlled periods.
    • The shortened break between autonomous to driver controlled period increases engagement by keeping the excitement of the match going.
    • The shortened break will encourage teams to build smarter and create sturdier robots, that can move successfully from autonomous to driver controlled unhindered.
    What does this mean to teams?

    Teams must remember is to keep an eye on the match timer display, and listen for the cues from the Emcee or Game Announcer to pick up their driver stations. The transition will happen quickly, and the scoring system will automatically run the rest of the match. Since the robots are not tied directly to the scoring system, teams must make sure they are ready to run their driver controlled programs after the 3-2-1 countdown.

    How does this impact the number of matches played?

    This will not impact the number of matches played at an event. From League Meets to State Championships, teams will still be able to play between 5 and 6 matches, depending on the specific tournament. Teams will still receive a minimum of 7 minutes between each match. Super Regionals and World Championship events will have additional matches. The number of matches at these events will be announced at a later date.

    Up righting/Untangling/Reconnecting Robots

    Because of the shortened transition from autonomous to driver controlled period, field personnel will no longer enter the field to upright or untangle any robots. Robots that have lost connections will not be reconnected by the Field Technical Adviser. Teams should take this into consideration when building and designing their robot.

    If you have any questions about the new changes to our match play format please email ftcteams@firstinspires.org. Happy Relic Recovering!

    Click here to watch the New Changes to  Match Play video on YouTube!